Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

5 years ago · 2 min. reading time · visibility 0 ·

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How to Engage Post Post: Views on the Etiquette of Blogging

How to Engage Post Post: Views on the Etiquette of Blogging

I originally wrote the "How I write" series on LinkedIn. There,Dawna Bate  suggested that I write one more. Dawna wanted me to write about dealing with comments.

Since Dawna inspired this post, I think it's fair that I start with a quote from her direct message to me.

I realized after I posted my first article that I had a responsibility to my readers. They take the time to comment. I need to take the time to acknowledge their feedback. :) --
Dawna Bate

Can I hear a "Halleluja"?

I think Dawna has the right idea. Some people talk about replying to comments as a way to develop engagement. It's more than just developing engagement. It's just plain old human politeness.

Nothing drives engagement like engagement (tweet)

We write posts for various reasons. Some of us just like to pontificate. Some want to establish a personal brand.

Most of us, I think, want to start a discussion.

By definition, a discussion is a two-way thing. (tweet)

That brings up three points

Not responding to comments defeats the purpose. No matter what your purpose is, this remains true.

The LinkedIn Influencer concept is inherently flawed because it is one-way. I may be wrong here. I don't follow many Influencers. I used to. When I first joined LinkedIn I followed dozens. Now I only follow three.

Only one ever responds, there. Bruce Kazanoff is more Bee than Influencer by nature.

Anne Handley also responds, but only on Twitter.  

Maybe other Influencers respond to comments on their posts. I haven't seen any.

There is often more "meat" in the comments than in the post. If you don't read them, you are missing out. A lot of stuff gets left on the cutting room floor. They pop back up in the comments.

Often, they spawn new posts.

How to respond

Even a "Thanks for taking the time to comment," is a good start. Sometimes that's all that's needed. Often, the comment requires a clarification or a deeper dive into a point.

Sometimes the response generates a whole new post, either for you or for the commenter. YAY!

Have fun with it. This isn’t the time to get overly formal.

Just think "discussion" and you'll do fine.

Respond even to those who disagree

Disagreement is normal. If everyone agreed all the time, what would be the point of communicating? Heck, what would be the point of thinking at all?

Responding to trolls, hijackers, and other A-holes

This one is an open question. My view is to respond politely and firmly. Others say to ignore them. Either route is acceptable. Just don't engage in mud-slinging.

You can't throw shit without getting your hands dirty. (tweet)

Can you link to your posts in comments on someone else’s post?

This one is tricky. It depends on the person posting. Personally, I don't mind if someone posts a link to an article that is on the same subject. If the other post relates to and can further the discussion, I'm more than OK with it.

It doesn't matter if it supports my view or contradicts it.

I don't like it when someone spouts crap like, "Great post. I accept all connection requests! <profile link>"

Some authors hate links.

You have to know the person. Maybe you can mention the title of the post. Mention why you think it adds value to the discussion too. That might pass. It might not.

When in doubt, err on the side of caution. Don't do it.

Let's do an impromptu poll

Authors, I invite you to share your opinions on this question. We can use Twitter as our medium. Nobody wants to intentionally offend anyone.

There is no correct answer. I think it's a matter of personal preference.

How to comment: The wrong way

I thought this was a problem limited to younger members. Many of my LinkedIn connections are friends of my kids. My C-suite connections intimidate them. I have since learned that it applies to a larger group.

They first read the comments to see if there is anything Earth shattering they can add. There seldom is. Then they hit "Like" and go away.

Here's a Scoop: The freaking post isn’t Earth shattering.

Why do you think your comment has to be?

Me

.

How to comment: The right way

Read the post. Comment. It's as simple as that.(tweet)

Comment before you read the other comments. Who cares if your viewpoint matches someone else's?

You have an opinion. You have a voice.

Speak.

Believe me, at the very least, the author will appreciate it.

Even if you repeat the viewpoint someone else already posted, who cares? They certainly won't mind your agreement.

No matter your opinion, someone else will agree. Someone else will disagree.

That's called "Life."

.

Paul's Post Scoring Thoughts

The lowest form of engagement is the View

These are the people who saw your post but were not engaged enough to do anything more. They may not even have read the whole thing.

I think of views as future connections for future engagement. Connections drive engagement, not views. But views drive connections.

Next up is the Like/Relevant

Liking a post (a.k.a. Finding it Relevant) means there is some engagement, but not enough to warrant the effort of commenting.  

Commenting is a deeper form of engagement

It involves more effort. A Like should always go with a Comment. To specify, Like the post before you Comment on it.

If someone Likes your comment and replies. It's only fair that you Like their response. Unless of course, you don't.

Either way, reply if you want to.

Sharing means full agreement or full disagreement

Sharing is the highest form of engagement. A Like and a Comment should go with every Share. Comment, even if the comment is just to say you are Sharing.

Always acknowledge a Share

This is not always possible given the LinkedIn algorithm. You may not even see the Share. So let's just say that you should acknowledge a share whenever you see one.

The reader has just paid you the highest possible compliment. A "Thank you" is definitely in order.

This is a little difficult to do regularly on beBee. Sometimes it’s hard to know who shared what and when.

Federico tells me they’re working on it.

.

This point transcends LinkedIn and beBee.

Acknowledge comments, mentions, and shares in every platform where you notice them.

It is impossible to thank someone too much. I don't think it's excessive to bring a Share to Twitter, or a Retweet back to LinkedIn for a "Thank you".

While we’re on the subject, it isn’t too much to thank a Retweet.

We don't ignore people speaking to us in a live setting.

We shouldn't ignore them online.

Let's keep the "Social" in "Social Media."

.

How to Engage Post Post: Views on the Etiquette of Blogging

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Comments
Javier 🐝 CR

Javier 🐝 CR

5 years ago #15

#22
done !

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

5 years ago #14

I need a favour... Can somebody share this post to the beBee Cheat Sheet hive? I already shared to 3

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

5 years ago #13

#16
I thank you for that, Julie Hickman, so does my Mom. She is still the resident etiquette Guru and Upholder Of ALL Laws of Politeness in our now very extended family.

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

5 years ago #12

#15
Geeze, Phillip Hubbell, then you must be uncomfortable all the time. You write very well, so it's only proper that you get complimented on it! Don't sweat the imperfections. There is no beauty without them.

mohammed khalaf

mohammed khalaf

5 years ago #11

I will become nearby friend don't care and read all articals, as it has been said, "tough times never last, but tough people do

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

5 years ago #10

#12
Well, that's my interpretation anyway, Gert. Like everything else, it's Your Voice, Your Choice.

Gert Scholtz

Gert Scholtz

5 years ago #9

Thank you Paul. Excellent pointers to blogging etiquette. I was not aware of the engagement hierarchy of "relevant", comment and share - now I know.

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

5 years ago #8

#10
You are very welcome, Fatima. Thanks for taking the time to comment

🐝 Fatima G. Williams

🐝 Fatima G. Williams

5 years ago #7

Blogging Etiquettes.#Great post Thank you @Paul.

🐝 Fatima G. Williams

🐝 Fatima G. Williams

5 years ago #6

True Paul \ Nothing drives engagement like engagement. I agree with all the point's here especially on " don't ignore the person online". Ken Boddie I agree when you say Life is tooo short to waste time on a one way street, Life is indeed too short, I wish we had 48 hours in a day :).

Ken Boddie

Ken Boddie

5 years ago #5

Took me a while, Paul \ to get over the fact that most so called 'Influencers' on LI just don't respond and don't engage. I even used to think that the upper echelon employ Ghost Writers (now don't get on your high horse) but then don't give them a brief to respond to comments. I'm over it x10. Life is too short to waste time trying to enter a one way street against the flow, especially since polite engagement is a culture, no almost a prerequisite, here on beBee. As for the trolls - you can alway contract little Billy Goat Gruff. 😀

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

5 years ago #4

#4
Acknowledging a share is simply saying thanks for sharing. The trouble is finding them

Franci 🐝Eugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador

Very useful points, Paul. I do get confused on how to acknowledge a share. Sending a message is the only way I know to acknowledge a share. Liking, commenting and sharing is a two way streetl

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

5 years ago #2

Thanks for th eshares, Javier C\u00e1mara Rica

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

Paul "Pablo" Croubalian

5 years ago #1

Dawna Bate is mentioned on this post