Royce Shook

3 years ago · 1 min. reading time · visibility 0 ·

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You may miss...

When you retire, you may miss the fast, hectic paced days, when you are scrambling to finish that latest project. You may miss being in the action, being held in high regard by your workmates and maybe even management. You may miss the stress of getting to work on time, finishing the day, rushing home. You may miss the chatter at work about what you will do or what you did on your weekend and holidays.

You may also miss the slow times and quiet days. Your circle of friends will become smaller, and you may miss those you called friends at work. You may miss plodding along at your own pace, working in spurts, and wondering where your next break will come from. Even your uncertainties, doubts, and fears may be missed.

As you focus on your workday, the idea of missing the stress of working sounds far-fetched, but it is true for many people. Many people who once held positions of relative power are faced with the idea that “I used to be someone important” but when I retired “I no longer am someone important”. Many of us identify who we are with what job we do, and in retirement, we have to focus on defining who we are, not by what job we do, but by what we do for others.

When you are first retired you miss work, strange but true. Life works like that, and we year for the safety of what we know. Retirement is a whole new adventure and not many tell us the rules. When we started work, others showed us or told us the rules and we followed them and become successful Now Boomers are making new rules about retirement so there is not a lot of rules to follow, and that is scary. However, the rewards of retirement will become known to you, over time and you will no longer miss any of the above. Trust me! As you adjust perhaps a glass of wine will help.

DTT wine on the patio. ;
Counts as an outdoor

activity.




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Claire L Cardwell

3 years ago #3

#2
Royce Shook - I just couldn't join the grey hoards and wanted a bigger horizon. (Most of the people on the train gave me the impression of hating their lives.) You are right a lucky few find jobs they love, with companies and leaders/bosses who appreciate them).

Royce Shook

3 years ago #2

#1
Claire, most people as you note are miserable going to work and probably are miserable at work. However, many miss it, a least for a while, once they no longer have it. A few of us actually found something to do that we loved and that we were paid for, so we actually never worked a day in our lives. I love that you got to enjoy the train ride, and were able to find something that allowed you an escape plan.

Claire L Cardwell

3 years ago #1

Royce Shook - yet another great piece! Despite wondering sometimes if that toasty feeling from the 10th onwards when you realise it's time to throw your toys out so you have 20 free to make the bills at the end of the month... that in my opinion is far far preferable to working for someone who is at best not that good. I spent a wee bit of time in London, occasionally sharing a train with my Dad who worked for Shell International (near Waterloo Bridge.). I used to look at the miserable people on the train (there was not one that was cheerful) and think to myself 'why would anyone in all honesty put themselves through that all day every day etc etc. I decided that by the age of 30 or so, a fully developed 'escape plan' would be implemented. It was just a question of what service wanted to provide. I then spent the rest of the train ride looking out at the trees, fields and houses rushing past in my window seat. (FYI - no one looked out except for me - they were too wrapped up in the greyness of their lives).

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